Sodium channel protein type 3 subunit alpha

Description:

Description
  • Accession: Q9NY46
  • Swissprot: SCN3A_HUMAN
  • Organism: Homo sapiens
  • Gene: SCN3A
  • Target class: Ion channel

Drug Relations:

articaine
A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE. Bioactivity details MOA
benzocaine
A surface anesthetic that acts by preventing transmission of impulses along NERVE FIBERS and at NERVE ENDINGS. Bioactivity details MOA
eslicarbazepine acetate
Eslicarbazepine acetate is extensively converted to eslicarbazepine, which is considered to be responsible for therapeutic effects in humans. The precise mechanism(s) by which eslicarbazepine exerts anticonvulsant activity is unknown but is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. Bioactivity details MOA
ethotoin
Ethotoin exerts an antiepileptic effect without causing general central nervous system depression. The mechanism of action is probably very similar to that of phenytoin. The latter drug appears to stabilize rather than to raise the normal seizure threshold, and to prevent the spread of seizure activity rather than to abolish the primary focus of seizure discharges. Bioactivity details MOA
hexylcaine
Bioactivity details MOA
lamotrigine
A phenyltriazine compound, sodium and calcium channel blocker that is used for the treatment of SEIZURES and BIPOLAR DISORDER. Bioactivity details MOA
lidocaine
A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE. Bioactivity details MOA
mephenytoin
An anticonvulsant effective in tonic-clonic epilepsy (EPILEPSY, TONIC-CLONIC). It may cause blood dyscrasias. Bioactivity details MOA
mepivacaine
A local anesthetic that is chemically related to BUPIVACAINE but pharmacologically related to LIDOCAINE. It is indicated for infiltration, nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is effective topically only in large doses and therefore should not be used by this route. (From AMA Drug Evaluations, 1994, p168) Bioactivity details MOA
oxybuprocaine
Bioactivity details MOA
phenazopyridine
A local anesthetic that has been used in urinary tract disorders. Its use is limited by problems with toxicity (primarily blood disorders) and potential carcinogenicity. Bioactivity details MOA
phenytoin
An anticonvulsant that is used to treat a wide variety of seizures. It is also an anti-arrhythmic and a muscle relaxant. The mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear, although several cellular actions have been described including effects on ion channels, active transport, and general membrane stabilization. The mechanism of its muscle relaxant effect appears to involve a reduction in the sensitivity of muscle spindles to stretch. Phenytoin has been proposed for several other therapeutic uses, but its use has been limited by its many adverse effects and interactions with other drugs. Bioactivity details MOA
prilocaine
A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry. Bioactivity details MOA
procainamide
A class Ia antiarrhythmic drug that is structurally-related to PROCAINE. Bioactivity details MOA
proparacaine
Bioactivity details MOA
propoxycaine
A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a rapid onset of action and a longer duration of action than procaine hydrochloride. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1017) Bioactivity details MOA
quinidine
An optical isomer of quinine, extracted from the bark of the CHINCHONA tree and similar plant species. This alkaloid dampens the excitability of cardiac and skeletal muscles by blocking sodium and potassium currents across cellular membranes. It prolongs cellular ACTION POTENTIALS, and decreases automaticity. Quinidine also blocks muscarinic and alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission. Bioactivity details MOA
ropivacaine
An anilide used as a long-acting local anesthetic. It has a differential blocking effect on sensory and motor neurons. Bioactivity details MOA
rufinamide
The precise mechanism(s) by which rufinamide exerts its antiepileptic effect is unknown. The results of in vitro studies suggest that the principal mechanism of action of rufinamide is modulation of the activity of sodium channels and, in particular, prolongation of the inactive state of the channel. Bioactivity details MOA
tetracaine
Local ester anesthetic that blocks both the initiation and conduction of nerve impulses by decreasing the neuronal membrane's permeability to sodium ions, which results in inhibition of depolarization with resultant blockade of conduction. Bioactivity details MOA
tocainide
An antiarrhythmic agent which exerts a potential- and frequency-dependent block of SODIUM CHANNELS. Bioactivity details MOA
azacyclonol
major descriptor (65-84); on-line search PIPERIDINES (65-84); Index Medicus search AZACYCLONOL (65-84); RN given refers to parent cpd Bioactivity details MOA
bepridil
A long-acting calcium-blocking agent with significant anti-anginal activity. The drug produces significant coronary vasodilation and modest peripheral effects. It has antihypertensive and selective anti-arrhythmia activities and acts as a calmodulin antagonist. Bioactivity details MOA
brompheniramine
Histamine H1 antagonist used in treatment of allergies, rhinitis, and urticaria. Bioactivity details MOA
butacaine
was MH 1965-92; BUTAPROBENZ & BUTOCAIN were see BUTACAINE 1978-92; use 4-AMINOBENZOIC ACID to search BUTACAINE 1966-92 Bioactivity details MOA
butethamine
Bioactivity details MOA
chlorphenamine
A histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic reactions, hay fever, rhinitis, urticaria, and asthma. It has also been used in veterinary applications. One of the most widely used of the classical antihistaminics, it generally causes less drowsiness and sedation than PROMETHAZINE. Bioactivity details MOA
chlorpromazine
The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking DOPAMINE RECEPTORS. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup. Bioactivity details MOA
cinchocaine
A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006) Bioactivity details MOA
cinnarizine
A piperazine derivative having histamine H1-receptor and calcium-channel blocking activity with vasodilating and antiemetic properties but it induces PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS. Bioactivity details MOA
cocaine
An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake. Bioactivity details MOA
colforsin daropate
Potent activator of the adenylate cyclase system and the biosynthesis of cyclic AMP. From the plant COLEUS FORSKOHLII. Has antihypertensive, positive inotropic, platelet aggregation inhibitory, and smooth muscle relaxant activities; also lowers intraocular pressure and promotes release of hormones from the pituitary gland. Bioactivity details MOA
cyclomethycaine
Bioactivity details MOA
cyproheptadine
A serotonin antagonist and a histamine H1 blocker used as antipruritic, appetite stimulant, antiallergic, and for the post-gastrectomy dumping syndrome, etc. Bioactivity details MOA
desipramine
A tricyclic dibenzazepine compound that potentiates neurotransmission. Desipramine selectively blocks reuptake of norepinephrine from the neural synapse, and also appears to impair serotonin transport. This compound also possesses minor anticholinergic activity, through its affinity to muscarinic receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
dicycloverine
A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic and in urinary incontinence. It has little effect on glandular secretion or the cardiovascular system. It does have some local anesthetic properties and is used in gastrointestinal, biliary, and urinary tract spasms. Bioactivity details MOA
dilazep
Coronary vasodilator with some antiarrhythmic activity. Bioactivity details MOA
diltiazem
A benzothiazepine derivative with vasodilating action due to its antagonism of the actions of CALCIUM ion on membrane functions. Bioactivity details MOA
diperodon
Bioactivity details MOA
diphenhydramine
A histamine H1 antagonist used as an antiemetic, antitussive, for dermatoses and pruritus, for hypersensitivity reactions, as a hypnotic, an antiparkinson, and as an ingredient in common cold preparations. It has some undesired antimuscarinic and sedative effects. Bioactivity details MOA
diphenidol
shows anti-arrhythmic activity; RN given refers to unlabeled parent cpd Bioactivity details MOA
droperidol
A butyrophenone with general properties similar to those of HALOPERIDOL. It is used in conjunction with an opioid analgesic such as FENTANYL to maintain the patient in a calm state of neuroleptanalgesia with indifference to surroundings but still able to cooperate with the surgeon. It is also used as a premedicant, as an antiemetic, and for the control of agitation in acute psychoses. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p593) Bioactivity details MOA
felodipine
A dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with positive inotropic effects. It lowers blood pressure by reducing peripheral vascular resistance through a highly selective action on smooth muscle in arteriolar resistance vessels. Bioactivity details MOA
fluphenazine
A phenothiazine used in the treatment of PSYCHOSES. Its properties and uses are generally similar to those of CHLORPROMAZINE. Bioactivity details MOA
gallopamil
Coronary vasodilator that is an analog of iproveratril (VERAPAMIL) with one more methoxy group on the benzene ring. Bioactivity details MOA
haloperidol
A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279) Bioactivity details MOA
hexobendine
A potent vasoactive agent that dilates cerebral and coronary arteries, but slightly constricts femoral arteries, without any effects on heart rate, blood pressure or cardiac output. Bioactivity details MOA
imipramine
The prototypical tricyclic antidepressant. It has been used in major depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, attention-deficit disorders, agoraphobia, and panic disorders. It has less sedative effect than some other members of this therapeutic group. Bioactivity details MOA
levorphanol
A narcotic analgesic that may be habit-forming. It is nearly as effective orally as by injection. Bioactivity details MOA
loperamide
One of the long-acting synthetic ANTIDIARRHEALS; it is not significantly absorbed from the gut, and has no effect on the adrenergic system or central nervous system, but may antagonize histamine and interfere with acetylcholine release locally. Bioactivity details MOA
mepacrine
An acridine derivative formerly widely used as an antimalarial but superseded by chloroquine in recent years. It has also been used as an anthelmintic and in the treatment of giardiasis and malignant effusions. It is used in cell biological experiments as an inhibitor of phospholipase A2. Bioactivity details MOA
meprylcaine
Bioactivity details MOA
mianserin
A tetracyclic compound with antidepressant effects. It may cause drowsiness and hematological problems. Its mechanism of therapeutic action is not well understood, although it apparently blocks alpha-adrenergic, histamine H1, and some types of serotonin receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
nifedipine
A potent vasodilator agent with calcium antagonistic action. It is a useful anti-anginal agent that also lowers blood pressure. Bioactivity details MOA
nisoldipine
A dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist that acts as a potent arterial vasodilator and antihypertensive agent. It is also effective in patients with cardiac failure and angina. Bioactivity details MOA
nitrendipine
A calcium channel blocker with marked vasodilator action. It is an effective antihypertensive agent and differs from other calcium channel blockers in that it does not reduce glomerular filtration rate and is mildly natriuretic, rather than sodium retentive. Bioactivity details MOA
oxetacaine
isolated from bioactive leaf extracts of Rollinia mucosa Bioactivity details MOA
parethoxycaine
Bioactivity details MOA
phenacaine
Bioactivity details MOA
pheniramine
One of the HISTAMINE H1 ANTAGONISTS with little sedative action. It is used in treatment of hay fever, rhinitis, allergic dermatoses, and pruritus. Bioactivity details MOA
phenoxybenzamine
An alpha-adrenergic antagonist with long duration of action. It has been used to treat hypertension and as a peripheral vasodilator. Bioactivity details MOA
phentolamine
A nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist. It is used in the treatment of hypertension and hypertensive emergencies, pheochromocytoma, vasospasm of RAYNAUD DISEASE and frostbite, clonidine withdrawal syndrome, impotence, and peripheral vascular disease. Bioactivity details MOA
pramocaine
Bioactivity details MOA
prazosin
A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION. Bioactivity details MOA
prenylamine
A drug formerly used in the treatment of angina pectoris but superseded by less hazardous drugs. Prenylamine depletes myocardial catecholamine stores and has some calcium channel blocking activity. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1406) Bioactivity details MOA
promazine
A phenothiazine with actions similar to CHLORPROMAZINE but with less antipsychotic activity. It is primarily used in short-term treatment of disturbed behavior and as an antiemetic. Bioactivity details MOA
promethazine
A phenothiazine derivative with histamine H1-blocking, antimuscarinic, and sedative properties. It is used as an antiallergic, in pruritus, for motion sickness and sedation, and also in animals. Bioactivity details MOA
quinine
An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood. Bioactivity details MOA
quinisocaine
Bioactivity details MOA
reserpine
An alkaloid found in the roots of Rauwolfia serpentina and R. vomitoria. Reserpine inhibits the uptake of norepinephrine into storage vesicles resulting in depletion of catecholamines and serotonin from central and peripheral axon terminals. It has been used as an antihypertensive and an antipsychotic as well as a research tool, but its adverse effects limit its clinical use. Bioactivity details MOA
spiperone
A spiro butyrophenone analog similar to HALOPERIDOL and other related compounds. It has been recommended in the treatment of SCHIZOPHRENIA. Bioactivity details MOA
strychnine
An alkaloid found in the seeds of STRYCHNOS NUX-VOMICA. It is a competitive antagonist at glycine receptors and thus a convulsant. It has been used as an analeptic, in the treatment of nonketotic hyperglycinemia and sleep apnea, and as a rat poison. Bioactivity details MOA
tetrabenazine
A drug formerly used as an antipsychotic and treatment of various movement disorders. Tetrabenazine blocks neurotransmitter uptake into adrenergic storage vesicles and has been used as a high affinity label for the vesicle transport system. Bioactivity details MOA
thioridazine
A phenothiazine antipsychotic used in the management of PHYCOSES, including SCHIZOPHRENIA. Bioactivity details MOA
trifluoperazine
A phenothiazine with actions similar to CHLORPROMAZINE. It is used as an antipsychotic and an antiemetic. Bioactivity details MOA
verapamil
A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent. Bioactivity details MOA
yohimbine
A plant alkaloid with alpha-2-adrenergic blocking activity. Yohimbine has been used as a mydriatic and in the treatment of ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION. Bioactivity details MOA