5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 3A

Description:

Description
  • Accession: P35563
  • Swissprot: 5HT3A_RAT
  • Organism: Rattus norvegicus
  • Gene: Htr3a
  • Target classes: GPCR, Ion channel

Drug Relations:

amfetamine
A powerful central nervous system stimulant and sympathomimetic. Amphetamine has multiple mechanisms of action including blocking uptake of adrenergics and dopamine, stimulation of release of monamines, and inhibiting monoamine oxidase. Amphetamine is also a drug of abuse and a psychotomimetic. The l- and the d,l-forms are included here. The l-form has less central nervous system activity but stronger cardiovascular effects. The d-form is DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. Bioactivity details MOA
apomorphine
A derivative of morphine that is a dopamine D2 agonist. It is a powerful emetic and has been used for that effect in acute poisoning. It has also been used in the diagnosis and treatment of parkinsonism, but its adverse effects limit its use. Bioactivity details MOA
cisapride
A substituted benzamide used for its prokinetic properties. It is used in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, and other disorders associated with impaired gastrointestinal motility. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed) Bioactivity details MOA
clomipramine
A tricyclic antidepressant similar to IMIPRAMINE that selectively inhibits the uptake of serotonin in the brain. It is readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and demethylated in the liver to form its primary active metabolite, desmethylclomipramine. Bioactivity details MOA
clozapine
A tricylic dibenzodiazepine, classified as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It binds several types of central nervous system receptors, and displays a unique pharmacological profile. Clozapine is a serotonin antagonist, with strong binding to 5-HT 2A/2C receptor subtype. It also displays strong affinity to several dopaminergic receptors, but shows only weak antagonism at the dopamine D2 receptor, a receptor commonly thought to modulate neuroleptic activity. Agranulocytosis is a major adverse effect associated with administration of this agent. Bioactivity details MOA
desipramine
A tricyclic dibenzazepine compound that potentiates neurotransmission. Desipramine selectively blocks reuptake of norepinephrine from the neural synapse, and also appears to impair serotonin transport. This compound also possesses minor anticholinergic activity, through its affinity to muscarinic receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
dexamfetamine
The d-form of AMPHETAMINE. It is a central nervous system stimulant and a sympathomimetic. It has also been used in the treatment of narcolepsy and of attention deficit disorders and hyperactivity in children. Dextroamphetamine has multiple mechanisms of action including blocking uptake of adrenergics and dopamine, stimulating release of monamines, and inhibiting monoamine oxidase. It is also a drug of abuse and a psychotomimetic. Bioactivity details MOA
doxepin
A dibenzoxepin tricyclic compound. It displays a range of pharmacological actions including maintaining adrenergic innervation. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, but it appears to block reuptake of monoaminergic neurotransmitters into presynaptic terminals. It also possesses anticholinergic activity and modulates antagonism of histamine H(1)- and H(2)-receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
granisetron
A serotonin receptor (5HT-3 selective) antagonist that has been used as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy patients. Bioactivity details MOA
imipramine
The prototypical tricyclic antidepressant. It has been used in major depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, attention-deficit disorders, agoraphobia, and panic disorders. It has less sedative effect than some other members of this therapeutic group. Bioactivity details MOA
levamfetamine
Bioactivity details MOA
metoclopramide
A dopamine D2 antagonist that is used as an antiemetic. Bioactivity details MOA
mianserin
A tetracyclic compound with antidepressant effects. It may cause drowsiness and hematological problems. Its mechanism of therapeutic action is not well understood, although it apparently blocks alpha-adrenergic, histamine H1, and some types of serotonin receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
mosapride
Mosapride is a 5-HT4 receptor agonist which increases the release of acetylcholine and stimulates GI motility. Bioactivity details MOA
ondansetron
A competitive serotonin type 3 receptor antagonist. It is effective in the treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs, including cisplatin, and has reported anxiolytic and neuroleptic properties. Bioactivity details MOA
quinagolide
Bioactivity details MOA
rizatriptan
Rizatriptan binds with high affinity to human cloned 5-HT1B/1D receptors. Rizatriptan presumably exerts its therapeutic effects in the treatment of migraine headache by binding to 5-HT1B/1D receptors located on intracranial blood vessels and sensory nerves of the trigeminal system. Bioactivity details MOA
tropisetron
An indole derivative and 5-HT3 RECEPTOR antagonist that is used for the prevention of nausea and vomiting. Bioactivity details MOA
tyramine
An indirect sympathomimetic that occurs naturally in cheese and other foods. Tyramine does not directly activate adrenergic receptors, but it can serve as a substrate for adrenergic uptake systems and MONOAMINE OXIDASE to prolong the actions of adrenergic transmitters. It also provokes transmitter release from adrenergic terminals and may be a neurotransmitter in some invertebrate nervous systems. Bioactivity details MOA
vilazodone
A benzofuran, indole, and piperazine derivative that functions as a SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITOR and partial SEROTONIN 5-HT1 RECEPTOR AGONIST. It is used as an ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENT. Bioactivity details MOA
vortioxetine
A piperazine derivative that acts as a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, as a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and 5-HT1A receptor agonist. It is used for the treatment of anxiety and depression. Bioactivity details MOA