Delta-type opioid receptor

Description:

Description
  • Accession: P33533
  • Swissprot: OPRD_RAT
  • Organism: Rattus norvegicus
  • Gene: Oprd1
  • Target class: GPCR

Drug Relations:

alfentanil
A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients. Bioactivity details MOA
apomorphine
A derivative of morphine that is a dopamine D2 agonist. It is a powerful emetic and has been used for that effect in acute poisoning. It has also been used in the diagnosis and treatment of parkinsonism, but its adverse effects limit its use. Bioactivity details MOA
buprenorphine
A derivative of the opioid alkaloid THEBAINE that is a more potent and longer lasting analgesic than MORPHINE. It appears to act as a partial agonist at mu and kappa opioid receptors and as an antagonist at delta receptors. The lack of delta-agonist activity has been suggested to account for the observation that buprenorphine tolerance may not develop with chronic use. Bioactivity details MOA
codeine
An opioid analgesic related to MORPHINE but with less potent analgesic properties and mild sedative effects. It also acts centrally to suppress cough. Bioactivity details MOA
desomorphine
an informal term for a cheap injectable illicit drug domestically prepared from codeine-containing medication in Russia Bioactivity details MOA
dopamine
One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action. Bioactivity details MOA
eluxadoline
Eluxadoline is a mu-opioid receptor agonist; eluxadoline is also a delta opioid receptor antagonist and a kappa opioid receptor agonist. The binding affinities (Ki) of eluxadoline for the human mu and delta opioid receptors are 1.8 nM and 430 nM, respectively. The binding affinity (Ki) of eluxadoline for the human kappa opioid receptor has not been determined; however, the Ki for guinea pig cerebellum kappa opioid receptor is 55 nM. In animals, eluxadoline interacts with opioid receptors in the gut. Bioactivity details MOA
fentanyl
A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. Bioactivity details MOA
haloperidol
A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279) Bioactivity details MOA
hydromorphone
An opioid analgesic made from MORPHINE and used mainly as an analgesic. It has a shorter duration of action than morphine. Bioactivity details MOA
ketobemidone
Bioactivity details MOA
levallorphan
An opioid antagonist with properties similar to those of NALOXONE; in addition it also possesses some agonist properties. It should be used cautiously; levallorphan reverses severe opioid-induced respiratory depression but may exacerbate respiratory depression such as that induced by alcohol or other non-opioid central depressants. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p683) Bioactivity details MOA
levomethadone
Bioactivity details MOA
levorphanol
A narcotic analgesic that may be habit-forming. It is nearly as effective orally as by injection. Bioactivity details MOA
loperamide
One of the long-acting synthetic ANTIDIARRHEALS; it is not significantly absorbed from the gut, and has no effect on the adrenergic system or central nervous system, but may antagonize histamine and interfere with acetylcholine release locally. Bioactivity details MOA
methadone
A synthetic opioid that is used as the hydrochloride. It is an opioid analgesic that is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. It has actions and uses similar to those of MORPHINE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1082-3) Bioactivity details MOA
morphine
The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle. Bioactivity details MOA
nalfurafine
Bioactivity details MOA
nalmefene
Bioactivity details MOA
nalorphine
A narcotic antagonist with some agonist properties. It is an antagonist at mu opioid receptors and an agonist at kappa opioid receptors. Given alone it produces a broad spectrum of unpleasant effects and it is considered to be clinically obsolete. Bioactivity details MOA
naloxone
A specific opiate antagonist that has no agonist activity. It is a competitive antagonist at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
naltrexone
Derivative of noroxymorphone that is the N-cyclopropylmethyl congener of NALOXONE. It is a narcotic antagonist that is effective orally, longer lasting and more potent than naloxone, and has been proposed for the treatment of heroin addiction. The FDA has approved naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence. Bioactivity details MOA
oxycodone
A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE. Bioactivity details MOA
oxymorphone
An opioid analgesic with actions and uses similar to those of MORPHINE, apart from an absence of cough suppressant activity. It is used in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, including pain in obstetrics. It may also be used as an adjunct to anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1092) Bioactivity details MOA
pentazocine
The first mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic to be marketed. It is an agonist at the kappa and sigma opioid receptors and has a weak antagonist action at the mu receptor. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1991, p97) Bioactivity details MOA
pethidine
A narcotic analgesic that can be used for the relief of most types of moderate to severe pain, including postoperative pain and the pain of labor. Prolonged use may lead to dependence of the morphine type; withdrawal symptoms appear more rapidly than with morphine and are of shorter duration. Bioactivity details MOA
somatostatin
A 14-amino acid peptide named for its ability to inhibit pituitary GROWTH HORMONE release, also called somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. It is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, the gut, and other organs. SRIF can also inhibit the release of THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE; PROLACTIN; INSULIN; and GLUCAGON besides acting as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In a number of species including humans, there is an additional form of somatostatin, SRIF-28 with a 14-amino acid extension at the N-terminal. Bioactivity details MOA
sufentanil
An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent. Bioactivity details MOA
sulbentine
Bioactivity details MOA