Glutamate receptor ionotropic, NMDA 2B

Description:

Description
  • Accession: Q00960
  • Swissprot: NMDE2_RAT
  • Organism: Rattus norvegicus
  • Gene: Grin2b
  • Target class: Ion channel

Drug Relations:

aspartic acid
One of the non-essential amino acids commonly occurring in the L-form. It is found in animals and plants, especially in sugar cane and sugar beets. It may be a neurotransmitter. Bioactivity details MOA
chlorpromazine
The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking DOPAMINE RECEPTORS. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup. Bioactivity details MOA
cycloserine
Antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces garyphalus. Bioactivity details MOA
dextromethorphan
Methyl analog of DEXTRORPHAN that shows high affinity binding to several regions of the brain, including the medullary cough center. This compound is an NMDA receptor antagonist (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and acts as a non-competitive channel blocker. It is one of the widely used ANTITUSSIVES, and is also used to study the involvement of glutamate receptors in neurotoxicity. Bioactivity details MOA
dextrothyroxine
The dextrorotary isomer of the synthetic THYROXINE. Bioactivity details MOA
etoxadrol
Bioactivity details MOA
glycine
A non-essential amino acid. It is found primarily in gelatin and silk fibroin and used therapeutically as a nutrient. It is also a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter. Bioactivity details MOA
ifenprodil
NMDA receptor antagonist; RN given refers to parent cpd without isomeric designation; structure Bioactivity details MOA
imipramine
The prototypical tricyclic antidepressant. It has been used in major depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, attention-deficit disorders, agoraphobia, and panic disorders. It has less sedative effect than some other members of this therapeutic group. Bioactivity details MOA
ketamine
A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
levomilnacipran
a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), mechanism of the antidepressant action of levomilnacipran is unknown, but is thought to be related to the potentiation of serotonin and norepinephrine in the central nervous system Bioactivity details MOA
levorphanol
A narcotic analgesic that may be habit-forming. It is nearly as effective orally as by injection. Bioactivity details MOA
pentamidine
Antiprotozoal agent effective in trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and some fungal infections; used in treatment of PNEUMOCYSTIS pneumonia in HIV-infected patients. It may cause diabetes mellitus, central nervous system damage, and other toxic effects. Bioactivity details MOA
phencyclidine
A hallucinogen formerly used as a veterinary anesthetic, and briefly as a general anesthetic for humans. Phencyclidine is similar to KETAMINE in structure and in many of its effects. Like ketamine, it can produce a dissociative state. It exerts its pharmacological action through inhibition of NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). As a drug of abuse, it is known as PCP and Angel Dust. Bioactivity details MOA