Carbonic anhydrase 1

Description:

Description
  • Accession: P00915
  • Swissprot: CAH1_HUMAN
  • Organism: Homo sapiens
  • Gene: CA1
  • Target class: Enzyme

Drug Relations:

acetazolamide
One of the CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS that is sometimes effective against absence seizures. It is sometimes useful also as an adjunct in the treatment of tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures, particularly in women whose seizures occur or are exacerbated at specific times in the menstrual cycle. However, its usefulness is transient often because of rapid development of tolerance. Its antiepileptic effect may be due to its inhibitory effect on brain carbonic anhydrase, which leads to an increased transneuronal chloride gradient, increased chloride current, and increased inhibition. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p337) Bioactivity details MOA
dichlorphenamide
A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used in the treatment of glaucoma. Bioactivity details MOA
ethoxzolamide
A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used as diuretic and in glaucoma. It may cause hypokalemia. Bioactivity details MOA
methazolamide
A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used as a diuretic and in the treatment of glaucoma. Bioactivity details MOA
methocarbamol
A centrally acting muscle relaxant whose mode of action has not been established. It is used as an adjunct in the symptomatic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions associated with painful muscle spasm. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1206) Bioactivity details MOA
aminobenzoic acid
An aminobenzoic acid isomer that combines with pteridine and GLUTAMIC ACID to form FOLIC ACID. The fact that 4-aminobenzoic acid absorbs light throughout the UVB range has also resulted in its use as an ingredient in SUNSCREENS. Bioactivity details MOA
amlodipine
A long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker. It is effective in the treatment of ANGINA PECTORIS and HYPERTENSION. Bioactivity details MOA
bendroflumethiazide
A thiazide diuretic with actions and uses similar to those of HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE. It has been used in the treatment of familial hyperkalemia, hypertension, edema, and urinary tract disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p810) Bioactivity details MOA
benzthiazide
Bioactivity details MOA
benzylsulfamide
Bioactivity details MOA
brinzolamide
an antiglaucoma agent Bioactivity details MOA
celecoxib
A pyrazole derivative and selective CYCLOOXYGENASE 2 INHIBITOR that is used to treat symptoms associated with RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS; OSTEOARTHRITIS and JUVENILE ARTHRITIS, as well as the management of ACUTE PAIN. Bioactivity details MOA
chlortalidone
A benzenesulfonamide-phthalimidine that tautomerizes to a BENZOPHENONES form. It is considered a thiazide-like diuretic. Bioactivity details MOA
cianidanol
An antioxidant flavonoid, occurring especially in woody plants as both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (cis) forms. Bioactivity details MOA
coumarin
effective in reducing edema following crush & thermal injury; structure in Merck Index, 9th ed, #2547; Coumarin itself occurs in the Tonka bean Bioactivity details MOA
diflunisal
A salicylate derivative and anti-inflammatory analgesic with actions and side effects similar to those of ASPIRIN. Bioactivity details MOA
ditiocarb
A chelating agent that has been used to mobilize toxic metals from the tissues of humans and experimental animals. It is the main metabolite of DISULFIRAM. Bioactivity details MOA
dobutamine
A catecholamine derivative with specificity for BETA-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. It is commonly used as a cardiotonic agent after CARDIAC SURGERY and during DOBUTAMINE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY. Bioactivity details MOA
dorzolamide
topically effective ocular hypotensive carbonic anhydrase inhibitor; RN refers to mono-HCl (4S-trans)-isomer Bioactivity details MOA
ethyl hydroxybenzoate
Bioactivity details MOA
furosemide
A benzoic-sulfonamide-furan. It is a diuretic with fast onset and short duration that is used for EDEMA and chronic RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. Bioactivity details MOA
gentisic acid
Bioactivity details MOA
guaiacol
An agent thought to have disinfectant properties and used as an expectorant. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p747) Bioactivity details MOA
hydrochlorothiazide
A thiazide diuretic often considered the prototypical member of this class. It reduces the reabsorption of electrolytes from the renal tubules. This results in increased excretion of water and electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, chloride, and magnesium. It is used in the treatment of several disorders including edema, hypertension, diabetes insipidus, and hypoparathyroidism. Bioactivity details MOA
hydroquinone
skin depigmentation agent Bioactivity details MOA
imatinib
A tyrosine kinase inhibitor and ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENT that inhibits the BCR-ABL kinase created by chromosome rearrangements in CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA and ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA, as well as PDG-derived tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Bioactivity details MOA
indapamide
A benzamide-sulfonamide-indole derived DIURETIC that functions by inhibiting SODIUM CHLORIDE SYMPORTERS. Bioactivity details MOA
lacosamide
a functionalized amino acid, selectively enhances slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, resulting in stabilization of hyperexcitable neuronal membranes and inhibition of repetitive neuronal firing, indicated for partial-onset seizures Bioactivity details MOA
levetiracetam
The precise mechanism(s) by which levetiracetam exerts its antiepileptic effect is unknown. The antiepileptic activity of levetiracetam was assessed in a number of animal models of epileptic seizures. Levetiracetam did not inhibit single seizures induced by maximal stimulation with electrical current or different chemoconvulsants and showed only minimal activity in submaximal stimulation and in threshold tests. Protection was observed, however, against secondarily generalized activity from focal seizures induced by pilocarpine and kainic acid, two chemoconvulsants that induce seizures that mimic some features of human complex partial seizures with secondary generalization. Levetiracetam also displayed inhibitory properties in the kindling model in rats, another model of human complex partial seizures, both during kindling development and in the fully kindled state. In vitro and in vivo recordings of epileptiform activity from the hippocampus have shown that levetiracetam inhibits burst firing without affecting normal neuronal excitability, suggesting that levetiracetam may selectively prevent hypersynchronization of epileptiform burst firing and propagation of seizure activity. Levetiracetam at concentrations of up to 10 uM did not demonstrate binding affinity for a variety of known receptors, such as those associated with benzodiazepines, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), glycine, NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), re-uptake sites, and second messenger systems. Furthermore, in vitro studies have failed to find an effect of levetiracetam on neuronal voltage-gated sodium or T-type calcium currents and levetiracetam does not appear to directly facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission. However, in vitro studies have demonstrated that levetiracetam opposes the activity of negative modulators of GABA- and glycine-gated currents and partially inhibits N-type calcium currents in neuronal cells. A saturable and stereoselective neuronal binding site in rat brain tissue has been described for levetiracetam. Experimental data indicate that this binding site is the synaptic vesicle protein SV2A, thought to be involved in the regulation of vesicle exocytosis. Although the molecular significance of levetiracetam binding to synaptic vesicle protein SV2A is not understood, levetiracetam and related analogs showed a rank order of affinity for SV2A which correlated with the potency of their antiseizure activity in audiogenic seizure-prone mice. These findings suggest that the interaction of levetiracetam with the SV2A protein may contribute to the antiepileptic mechanism of action of the drug. Bioactivity details MOA
mafenide
A sulfonamide that inhibits the enzyme CARBONIC ANHYDRASE and is used as a topical anti-bacterial agent, especially in burn therapy. Bioactivity details MOA
methylparaben
used as a preservative in cosmetics but potentiates UV-induced damage of skin; RN given refers to parent cpd Bioactivity details MOA
nilotinib
Nilotinib is an inhibitor of the BCR-ABL kinase. Nilotinib binds to and stabilizes the inactive conformation of the kinase domain of ABL protein. In vitro, nilotinib inhibited BCR-ABL mediated proliferation of murine leukemic cell lines and human cell lines derived from patients with Ph+ CML. Under the conditions of the assays, nilotinib was able to overcome imatinib resistance resulting from BCR-ABL kinase mutations, in 32 out of 33 mutations tested. In vivo, nilotinib reduced the tumor size in a murine BCR-ABL xenograft model. Bioactivity details MOA
paracetamol
Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage. Bioactivity details MOA
paraoxon
An organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as a pesticide. Bioactivity details MOA
phenol
An antiseptic and disinfectant aromatic alcohol. Bioactivity details MOA
propofol
An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS. Bioactivity details MOA
quercetin
A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin. Bioactivity details MOA
salicylic acid
A compound obtained from the bark of the white willow and wintergreen leaves. It has bacteriostatic, fungicidal, and keratolytic actions. Bioactivity details MOA
silymarin
A mixture of flavonoids extracted from seeds of the MILK THISTLE, Silybum marianum. It consists primarily of silybin and its isomers, silicristin and silidianin. Silymarin displays antioxidant and membrane stabilizing activity. It protects various tissues and organs against chemical injury, and shows potential as an antihepatoxic agent. Bioactivity details MOA
sodium acetate
The trihydrate sodium salt of acetic acid, which is used as a source of sodium ions in solutions for dialysis and as a systemic and urinary alkalizer, diuretic, and expectorant. Bioactivity details MOA
sodium nitrite
Nitrous acid sodium salt. Used in many industrial processes, in meat curing, coloring, and preserving, and as a reagent in ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES. It is used therapeutically as an antidote in cyanide poisoning. The compound is toxic and mutagenic and will react in vivo with secondary or tertiary amines thereby producing highly carcinogenic nitrosamines. Bioactivity details MOA
sulfanilamide
Sulfanilamide has been a useful ingredient of vaginal formulations for about four decades. It blocks certain metabolic processes essential for the growth of susceptible bacteria. Bioactivity details MOA
sulfasalazine
A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907) Bioactivity details MOA
sulfur
An element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has an atomic symbol S, atomic number 16, and atomic weight [32.059; 32.076]. It is found in the amino acids cysteine and methionine. Bioactivity details MOA
sulpiride
A dopamine D2-receptor antagonist. It has been used therapeutically as an antidepressant, antipsychotic, and as a digestive aid. (From Merck Index, 11th ed) Bioactivity details MOA
sultiame
Bioactivity details MOA
tannic acid
Bioactivity details MOA
topiramate
The precise mechanisms by which topiramate exerts its anticonvulsant and migraine prophylaxis effects are unknown; however, preclinical studies have revealed four properties that may contribute to topiramate's efficacy for epilepsy and migraine prophylaxis. Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence suggests that topiramate, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, blocks voltage-dependent sodium channels, augments the activity of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyrate at some subtypes of the GABA-A receptor, antagonizes the AMPA/kainate subtype of the glutamate receptor, and inhibits the carbonic anhydrase enzyme, particularly isozymes II and IV. Bioactivity details MOA
trichlormethiazide
A thiazide diuretic with properties similar to those of HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p830) Bioactivity details MOA
trientine
An ethylenediamine derivative used as stabilizer for EPOXY RESINS, as ampholyte for ISOELECTRIC FOCUSING and as chelating agent for copper in HEPATOLENTICULAR DEGENERATION. Bioactivity details MOA
valdecoxib
a COX-2 inhibitor Bioactivity details MOA
verapamil
A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent. Bioactivity details MOA
zonisamide
an antiseizure drug chemically classified as a sulfonamide and unrelated to other antiseizure agents, blocks sodium channels and reduces voltage-dependent, transient inward currents (T-type Ca2+ currents), consequently stabilizing neuronal membranes and suppressing neuronal hypersynchronization Bioactivity details MOA