Glutamate receptor ionotropic, NMDA 2D

Description:

Description
  • Accession: O15399
  • Swissprot: NMDE4_HUMAN
  • Organism: Homo sapiens
  • Gene: GRIN2D
  • Target class: Ion channel

Drug Relations:

acamprosate
The mechanism of action of acamprosate in maintenance of alcohol abstinence is not completely understood. Chronic alcohol exposure is hypothesized to alter the normal balance between neuronal excitation and inhibition. In vitro and in vivo studies in animals have provided evidence to suggest acamprosate may interact with glutamate and GABA neurotransmitter systems centrally, and has led to the hypothesis that acamprosate restores this balance. Bioactivity details MOA
amantadine
An antiviral that is used in the prophylactic or symptomatic treatment of influenza A. It is also used as an antiparkinsonian agent, to treat extrapyramidal reactions, and for postherpetic neuralgia. The mechanisms of its effects in movement disorders are not well understood but probably reflect an increase in synthesis and release of dopamine, with perhaps some inhibition of dopamine uptake. Bioactivity details MOA
ketamine
A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors. Bioactivity details MOA
budipine
Bioactivity details MOA
chlorpromazine
The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking DOPAMINE RECEPTORS. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup. Bioactivity details MOA
cycloserine
Antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces garyphalus. Bioactivity details MOA
levorphanol
A narcotic analgesic that may be habit-forming. It is nearly as effective orally as by injection. Bioactivity details MOA
loperamide
One of the long-acting synthetic ANTIDIARRHEALS; it is not significantly absorbed from the gut, and has no effect on the adrenergic system or central nervous system, but may antagonize histamine and interfere with acetylcholine release locally. Bioactivity details MOA
orphenadrine
A muscarinic antagonist used to treat drug-induced parkinsonism and to relieve pain from muscle spasm. Bioactivity details MOA
phencyclidine
A hallucinogen formerly used as a veterinary anesthetic, and briefly as a general anesthetic for humans. Phencyclidine is similar to KETAMINE in structure and in many of its effects. Like ketamine, it can produce a dissociative state. It exerts its pharmacological action through inhibition of NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). As a drug of abuse, it is known as PCP and Angel Dust. Bioactivity details MOA
procyclidine
A muscarinic antagonist that crosses the blood-brain barrier and is used in the treatment of drug-induced extrapyramidal disorders and in parkinsonism. Bioactivity details MOA